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Here is how to work out the overloading of vehicle in absence of load challan-GR-LR & Impact of overloading on insurance claim

The carriage of bulk materials is very common and may be one of the easiest ways for a one-man operator to enter the business.

 

Load challan: Load challan or GR-goods receipt or LR-lorry receipt is an important document while processing a goods carrying commercial vehicle insurance claim. The load carrying capacity of a vehicle depends on size, type & design of the vehicle which is ascertained from laden-unladen wt. mentioned in the registration certificate & route permit of the commercial vehicle.

 

LR/GR: LR Stands for Lorry Receipt & GR for goods receipt & are also called “Bilti” in Hindi. This receipt is either in 3 copies or 5 copies i.e. Consignee copy, Driver Copy, Consigner Copy and File Copy. This receipt is made by the Transporter once the material is loaded on the vehicle for Delivery.

In case of transportation of goods in organized business sector the GR along with the the invoice for the loaded goods is available for ascertaining the weight of goods being carried out at the time of accident but in case of the unorganized sector, the trucks carrying sand, gravel, stones, clinker, stone chipping, ashes, broken bricks & lot of other building materials etc. which is carried out in loose form & carrier sometimes don’t possess any GR or weigh slip making it difficult for surveyors & insurers to determine the material weight which is required to be in the laden-unladen weight range & permissible load carrying capacity of the vehicle.

This type of material is sold in volumes & carried out in loose form & Wt. estimation of the same becomes little difficult. So if you have any document showing the volume of the material, the wt. can be ascertained with density but in case no document is made available, you have to work out the volume by knowing the length, breadth & height of the open body of the truck & may work out the weight of material with the help of a table below:

 

Ready reckoner to work out the vol. to wt. of material

One cu. Meter=35.314 cubic ft.

Material Weight per cubic meter

 

Dry earth 1249kg
Moist earth 1442kg
DryGravel 1682Kg
Wet gravel 2002Kg
Dry sand 1602 Kg
Wet sand 1922
Bricks 1600-1900Kg
Broken bricks coarse 1010Kg
Broken bricks fine 1450Kg
Sand stone 2800Kg
Broken stone Grit-dry 1600-1870Kg
Lime stone 2650Kg
Burnt clay 1600-192oKg
Broken dust (sukrhi) 1010Kg
Cement 1400Kg
Collar 1200 Kg

 

Broken bricks fine 1450Kg
Sand stone 2800Kg
Broken stone Grit-dry 1600-1870Kg
Lime stone 2650Kg
Burnt clay 1600-192oKg
Broken dust (sukrhi) 1010Kg
Cement 1400Kg
Collar 1200 Kg

 

Per cubic meter wt. of liquids

Petrol 820Kg
Diesal 830Kg
Kerosene 750Kg
Furnace oil 900Kg
Sulphuric acid 1800Kg
Nitric acid 1500Kg
Water 1600-1900Kg
Vegetable oil 930Kg

 

In addition the wt. of one cubic meter wood is about 1200 Kg. If the material is in bags, the wt. can be ascertained easily by weighing one bag. Cement is transported in bags of 50 Kg. each, so twenty bags are equalient of one tonne.

The overloading of the vehicle has direct bearing over vehicle accidents & so insurers can always reject the insurance claim of overloaded vehicle. However some of the insurers ignore 5% of overload & above that 25% deduction is made in the claim amount. But in case of overloading above 25% of the carrying capacity, the claim is rejected out rightly.

 

Vehicle fitness for insurance claim

J.D.Batta-surveyor & Loss Assessor

Admin-Claim Hub, Chandigarh

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